Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygdala

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_7A2AD7EFCBAC
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygdala
Périodique
Journal of Comparative Neurology
Auteur(s)
Chareyron L.J., Banta Lavenex P., Amaral D.G., Lavenex P.
ISSN
1096-9861 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0021-9967
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
519
Numéro
16
Pages
3218-3239
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The amygdala is part of a neural network that contributes to the regulation of emotional behaviors. Rodents, especially rats, are used extensively as model organisms to decipher the functions of specific amygdala nuclei, in particular in relation to fear and emotional learning. Analysis of the role of the nonhuman primate amygdala in these functions has lagged work in the rodent but provides evidence for conservation of basic functions across species. Here we provide quantitative information regarding the morphological characteristics of the main amygdala nuclei in rats and monkeys, including neuron and glial cell numbers, neuronal soma size, and individual nuclei volumes. The volumes of the lateral, basal, and accessory basal nuclei were, respectively, 32, 39, and 39 times larger in monkeys than in rats. In contrast, the central and medial nuclei were only 8 and 4 times larger in monkeys than in rats. The numbers of neurons in the lateral, basal, and accessory basal nuclei were 14, 11, and 16 times greater in monkeys than in rats, whereas the numbers of neurons in the central and medial nuclei were only 2.3 and 1.5 times greater in monkeys than in rats. Neuron density was between 2.4 and 3.7 times lower in monkeys than in rats, whereas glial density was only between 1.1 and 1.7 times lower in monkeys than in rats. We compare our data in rats and monkeys with those previously published in humans and discuss the theoretical and functional implications that derive from our quantitative structural findings.
Mots-clé
Amygdala/anatomy & histology, Animals, Female, Macaca mulatta, Male, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/10/2012 14:25
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:33
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