Autistic spectrum disorder: evaluating a possible contributing or causal role of epilepsy.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_792E97199668
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Autistic spectrum disorder: evaluating a possible contributing or causal role of epilepsy.
Périodique
Epilepsia
Auteur(s)
Deonna T., Roulet E.
ISSN
0013-9580
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
47 Suppl 2
Pages
79-82
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Résumé
The onset of epilepsy in brain systems involved in social communication and/or recognition of emotions can occasionally be the cause of autistic symptoms or may aggravate preexisting autistic symptoms. Knowing that cognitive and/or behavioral abnormalities can be the presenting and sometimes the only symptom of an epileptic disorder or can even be caused by paroxysmal EEG abnormalities without recognized seizures, the possibility that this may apply to autism has given rise to much debate. Epilepsy and/or epileptic EEG abnormalities are frequently associated with autistic disorders in children but this does not necessarily imply that they are the cause; great caution needs to be exercised before drawing any such conclusions. So far, there is no evidence that typical autism can be attributed to an epileptic disorder, even in those children with a history of regression after normal early development. Nevertheless, there are several early epilepsies (late infantile spasms, partial complex epilepsies, epilepsies with CSWS, early forms of Landau-Kleffner syndrome) and with different etiologies (tuberous sclerosis is an important model of these situations) in which a direct relationship between epilepsy and some features of autism may be suspected. In young children who primarily have language regression (and who may have autistic features) without evident cause, and in whom paroxysmal focal EEG abnormalities are also found, the possible direct role of epilepsy can only be evaluated in longitudinal studies.
Mots-clé
Adult, Autistic Disorder/epidemiology, Autistic Disorder/etiology, Brain/physiopathology, Child, Cognition Disorders/diagnosis, Cognition Disorders/epidemiology, Comorbidity, Developmental Disabilities/physiopathology, Electroencephalography/statistics & numerical data, Epilepsy/complications, Epilepsy/epidemiology, Humans, Infant, Language Development Disorders/diagnosis, Language Development Disorders/physiopathology, Spasms, Infantile/physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
12/01/2010 10:09
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:31
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