Language lateralisation measured across linguistic and national boundaries.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_78FC89D7E2FF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Language lateralisation measured across linguistic and national boundaries.
Périodique
Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
Auteur(s)
Hausmann M., Brysbaert M., van der Haegen L., Lewald J., Specht K., Hirnstein M., Willemin J., Barton J., Buchilly D., Chmetz F., Roch M., Brederoo S., Dael N., Mohr C.
ISSN
1973-8102 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0010-9452
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
111
Pages
134-147
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The visual half-field technique has been shown to be a reliable and valid neuropsychological measurement of language lateralisation, typically showing higher accuracy and faster correct responses for linguistic stimuli presented in the right visual field (RVF) than left visual field (LVF). The RVF advantage corresponds to the well-known dominance of the left hemisphere (LH) in processing language(s). However, clinical and experimental neuroscientists around the globe use different variations of the visual half-field paradigm, making direct comparisons difficult. The current study used a word/non-word visual half-field paradigm with translingual stimuli. In total, 496 participants from seven European countries were investigated: Belgium (64), England (49), Germany (85), Italy (34), The Netherlands (87), Norway (51), and Switzerland (126), covering six international languages (Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Norwegian). All language groups revealed a significant RVF/LH advantage in accuracy and reaction times that accounted for up to 26.1% of the total variance in performance. We found some variation in the degree of the RVF/LH advantage across language groups, accounting for a maximum of 3.7% of the total variance in performance. The RVF/LH advantage did not differ between subsamples speaking English, French or German as first or second languages or between monolingual and early/late bi/multilinguals. The findings suggest that the translingual lexical decision task (TLDT) is a simple but reliable measurement of language lateralisation that can be applied clinically and experimentally across linguistic and national boundaries.
Mots-clé
Hemispheric asymmetry, Languages, Lateralisation, Lexical decision task, Visual half-field paradigm
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
06/12/2018 10:20
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:35
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