The altitudinal niche breadth hypothesis in plant-insect interaction

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_789DFCACCCC5
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Titre
The altitudinal niche breadth hypothesis in plant-insect interaction
Titre du livre
Plant Insect Interactions
Auteur(s)
Rasmann S., Alvarez N., Pellissier L.
Editeur
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Lieu d'édition
Oxford
ISBN
978-0-470-67036-1
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Editeur scientifique
Voelckel C., Jander G.
Volume
47
Série
Annual Plant Reviews
Numéro de chapitre
10
Pages
339-360
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Studies aiming at explaining specialization along latitudinal gradients of plant-herbivore interactions have, to date, yielded inconclusive results. Here we propose the use of steep altitudinal gradients for dissecting factors driving evolution of polyphagy in insect herbivores. First, we test whether colonization of high elevation environment favours increased niche-breadth in two disparate insect groups - the wood-boring beetles and the pollinator group of bees - and show increased polyphagy at higher altitudes in both groups. We then assess classic assumptions transferred from the 'latitude-niche-breadth hypothesis', particularly the increase in environmental variability at high, compared to low, altitude. Finally, we discuss alternative mechanisms shaping the observed pattern of increased polyphagy in altitude, including variation in plant quality and predator pressure at different altitudes. We thus suggest evidence for the 'altitude niche-breadth hypothesis', in which both abiotic and biotic conditions, including increased variability and an increase of the potential feeding niche-breadth, promote evolution for increased insect polyphagy in altitude.
Mots-clé
Altitudinal gradient, Apiformes, Buprestidae, climatic variability, oligolectic species, oligophagy, plant-herbivore interaction, plant-pollinator interaction, polylectic species, polyphagy
Web of science
Création de la notice
28/11/2011 15:30
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:35
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