Myeloid cells contribute to tumor lymphangiogenesis.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_75C4C6E8AF12.P001.pdf (890.50 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_75C4C6E8AF12
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Myeloid cells contribute to tumor lymphangiogenesis.
Périodique
PloS One
Auteur(s)
Zumsteg A., Baeriswyl V., Imaizumi N., Schwendener R., Rüegg C., Christofori G.
ISSN
1932-6203[electronic]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Volume
4
Numéro
9
Pages
e7067
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis) promotes tumor outgrowth and metastasis. Previously, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) can contribute to tumor angiogenesis. However, the role of BMDC in lymphangiogenesis has largely remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate by bone marrow transplantation/reconstitution and genetic lineage-tracing experiments that BMDC integrate into tumor-associated lymphatic vessels in the Rip1Tag2 mouse model of insulinoma and in the TRAMP-C1 prostate cancer transplantation model, and that the integrated BMDC originate from the myelomonocytic lineage. Conversely, pharmacological depletion of tumor-associated macrophages reduces lymphangiogenesis. No cell fusion events are detected by genetic tracing experiments. Rather, the phenotypical conversion of myeloid cells into lymphatic endothelial cells and their integration into lymphatic structures is recapitulated in two in vitro tube formation assays and is dependent on fibroblast growth factor-mediated signaling. Together, the results reveal that myeloid cells can contribute to tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, thus extending the findings on the previously reported role of hematopoietic cells in lymphatic vessel formation.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/01/2010 15:58
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 18:24
Données d'usage