Pregnancy does not accelerate corticotroph tumor progression in Nelson's syndrome.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_74DAA6307DDA
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Pregnancy does not accelerate corticotroph tumor progression in Nelson's syndrome.
Périodique
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Auteur(s)
Jornayvaz F.R., Assie G., Bienvenu-Perrard M., Coste J., Guignat L., Bertherat J., Silvera S., Bertagna X., Legmann P.
ISSN
1945-7197 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0021-972X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
96
Numéro
4
Pages
E658-E662
Langue
anglais
Résumé
CONTEXT: Pituitary surgery is the first line of treatment for Cushing's disease; when surgery fails, bilateral adrenalectomy may be proposed, particularly for women with a desire for pregnancy. Little is known about the impact of pregnancy on corticotroph tumor progression after bilateral adrenalectomy.
OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the impact of pregnancy on corticotroph tumor progression after bilateral adrenalectomy in Cushing's disease and to assess maternal and pregnancy outcomes.
DESIGN: We conducted a retrospective cohort study.
SETTING: Patients who became pregnant after bilateral adrenalectomy were followed in a single center.
PATIENTS: Twenty pregnancies from 11 patients with Cushing's disease were treated by bilateral adrenalectomy and no pituitary irradiation.
MEASUREMENTS: Corticotroph tumor progression was assessed by serial pituitary magnetic resonance imaging and plasma ACTH measurements before, during, and after pregnancy. Comparisons were performed using paired Wilcoxon rank tests. Data on maternal and neonatal outcomes were recorded by correspondence from patients and obstetricians.
RESULTS: Corticotroph tumor progression occurred in eight of 17 pregnancies, and ACTH increased in eight of 10 pregnancies. However, rates of increase during or after pregnancy were not faster than those observed before pregnancy. Maternal complications occurred in four pregnancies from two patients, including gestational hypertension in three and gestational diabetes mellitus in three. Among these four pregnancies, three had a favorable outcome, and one led to an in utero death after eclampsia, due to loss to follow-up. No other maternal or fetal complications were reported.
CONCLUSION: Pregnancy does not accelerate corticotroph tumor progression after bilateral adrenalectomy. Pregnancy is manageable, provided the patients can be followed closely.
Mots-clé
ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma/complications, ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma/epidemiology, Adenoma/complications, Adenoma/epidemiology, Adolescent, Adrenalectomy/rehabilitation, Adult, Cohort Studies, Disease Progression, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Nelson Syndrome/diagnosis, Nelson Syndrome/epidemiology, Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion/epidemiology, Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion/etiology, Pregnancy/physiology, Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/epidemiology, Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/pathology, Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
10/09/2015 13:32
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:29
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