Rapid Sequestration of Leishmania mexicana by Neutrophils Contributes to the Development of Chronic Lesion.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_74421C6C7D5B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Rapid Sequestration of Leishmania mexicana by Neutrophils Contributes to the Development of Chronic Lesion.
Périodique
PLoS Pathogens
Auteur(s)
Hurrell B.P., Schuster S., Grün E., Coutaz M., Williams R.A., Held W., Malissen B., Malissen M., Yousefi S., Simon H.U., Müller A.J., Tacchini-Cottier F.
ISSN
1553-7374 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1553-7366
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Volume
11
Numéro
5
Pages
e1004929
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The protozoan Leishmania mexicana parasite causes chronic non-healing cutaneous lesions in humans and mice with poor parasite control. The mechanisms preventing the development of a protective immune response against this parasite are unclear. Here we provide data demonstrating that parasite sequestration by neutrophils is responsible for disease progression in mice. Within hours of infection L. mexicana induced the local recruitment of neutrophils, which ingested parasites and formed extracellular traps without markedly impairing parasite survival. We further showed that the L. mexicana-induced recruitment of neutrophils impaired the early recruitment of dendritic cells at the site of infection as observed by intravital 2-photon microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. Indeed, infection of neutropenic Genista mice and of mice depleted of neutrophils at the onset of infection demonstrated a prominent role for neutrophils in this process. Furthermore, an increase in monocyte-derived dendritic cells was also observed in draining lymph nodes of neutropenic mice, correlating with subsequent increased frequency of IFNγ-secreting T helper cells, and better parasite control leading ultimately to complete healing of the lesion. Altogether, these findings show that L. mexicana exploits neutrophils to block the induction of a protective immune response and impairs the control of lesion development. Our data thus demonstrate an unanticipated negative role for these innate immune cells in host defense, suggesting that in certain forms of cutaneous leishmaniasis, regulating neutrophil recruitment could be a strategy to promote lesion healing.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
20/06/2015 9:33
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:27
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