Biomechanical characterization and in vitro mechanical injury of elderly human femoral head cartilage: comparison to adult bovine humeral head cartilage.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_737E53FAAB8F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Biomechanical characterization and in vitro mechanical injury of elderly human femoral head cartilage: comparison to adult bovine humeral head cartilage.
Périodique
Osteoarthritis and cartilage / OARS, Osteoarthritis Research Society
Auteur(s)
Démarteau O., Pillet L., Inaebnit A., Borens O., Quinn T.M.
ISSN
1063-4584
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Numéro
6
Pages
589-96
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't - Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
OBJECTIVES: In vitro mechanical injury of articular cartilage is useful to identify events associated with development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (OA). To date, many in vitro injury models have used animal cartilage despite the greater clinical relevance of human cartilage. We aimed to characterize a new in vitro injury model using elderly human femoral head cartilage and compare its behavior to that of an existing model with adult bovine humeral head cartilage. DESIGN: Mechanical properties of human and bovine cartilage disks were characterized by elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability in radially confined axial compression, and by Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and direction-dependent radial strain in unconfined compression. Biochemical composition was assessed in terms of tissue water, solid, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents. Responses to mechanical injury were assessed by observation of macroscopic superficial tissue cracks and histological measurements of cell viability following single injurious ramp loads at 7 or 70%/s strain rate to 3 or 14 MPa peak stress. RESULTS: Confined compression moduli and Young's moduli were greater in elderly human femoral cartilage vs adult bovine humeral cartilage whereas hydraulic permeability was less. Radial deformations of axially compressed explant disks were more anisotropic (direction-dependent) for the human cartilage. In both cartilage sources, tissue cracking and associated cell death during injurious loading was common for 14 MPa peak stress at both strain rates. CONCLUSION: Despite differences in mechanical properties, acute damage induced by injurious loading was similar in both elderly human femoral cartilage and adult bovine humeral cartilage, supporting the clinical relevance of animal-based cartilage injury models. However, inherent structural differences such as cell density may influence subsequent cell-mediated responses to injurious loading and affect the development of OA.
Mots-clé
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Biomechanics, Cartilage, Articular, Cattle, Cell Death, Elasticity, Female, Femur Head, Glycosaminoglycans, Hip Joint, Humans, Humerus, Male, Models, Biological, Permeability, Stress, Mechanical
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 16:17
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 20:25
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