Accelerated and high-resolution cardiac T<sub>2</sub> mapping through peripheral k-space sharing.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_6FF60768689C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Accelerated and high-resolution cardiac T<sub>2</sub> mapping through peripheral k-space sharing.
Périodique
Magnetic resonance in medicine
Auteur(s)
Darçot E., Yerly J., Colotti R., Masci P.G., Chaptinel J., Feliciano H., Bianchi V., van Heeswijk R.B.
ISSN
1522-2594 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0740-3194
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
81
Numéro
1
Pages
220-233
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To develop high-spatial-resolution cardiac T <sub>2</sub> mapping that allows for a reduced acquisition time while maintaining its precision. We implemented and optimized a new golden-angle radial T <sub>2</sub> mapping technique named SKRATCH (Shared k-space Radial T <sub>2</sub> Characterization of the Heart) that shares k-space peripheries of T <sub>2</sub> -weighted images while preserving their contrasts.
Six SKRATCH variants (gradient-recalled echo and balanced SSFP, free-breathing and breath-held, with and without a saturation preparation) were implemented, and their precision was compared with a navigator-gated reference technique in phantoms and 22 healthy volunteers at 3 T. The optimal breath-held SKRATCH technique was applied in a small cohort of patients with subacute myocardial infarction.
The faster free-breathing SKRATCH technique reduced the acquisition time by 52.4%, while maintaining the precision and spatial resolution of the reference technique. Similarly, the most precise and robust breath-held SKRATCH technique demonstrated homogenous T <sub>2</sub> values that did not significantly differ from the navigator-gated reference (T <sub>2</sub>  = 39.9 ± 3.4 ms versus 39.5 ± 3.4 ms, P > .20, respectively). All infarct patients demonstrated a large T <sub>2</sub> elevation in the ischemic regions of the myocardium.
The optimized SKRATCH technique enabled the accelerated acquisition of high-spatial-resolution T <sub>2</sub> maps, was validated in healthy adult volunteers, and was successfully applied to a small initial group of patients.
Mots-clé
KWIC filter, T2 mapping, heart, high spatial resolution, infarction, radial imaging
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
07/08/2018 10:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:28
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