The hidden life of integrative and conjugative elements.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_6E8C309F2480
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The hidden life of integrative and conjugative elements.
Périodique
FEMS Microbiology Reviews
Auteur(s)
Delavat F., Miyazaki R., Carraro N., Pradervand N., van der Meer J.R.
ISSN
1574-6976 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0168-6445
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
41
Numéro
4
Pages
512-537
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) are widespread mobile DNA that transmit both vertically, in a host-integrated state, and horizontally, through excision and transfer to new recipients. Different families of ICEs have been discovered with more or less restricted host ranges, which operate by similar mechanisms but differ in regulatory networks, evolutionary origin and the types of variable genes they contribute to the host. Based on reviewing recent experimental data, we propose a general model of ICE life style that explains the transition between vertical and horizontal transmission as a result of a bistable decision in the ICE-host partnership. In the large majority of cells, the ICE remains silent and integrated, but hidden at low to very low frequencies in the population specialized host cells appear in which the ICE starts its process of horizontal transmission. This bistable process leads to host cell differentiation, ICE excision and transfer, when suitable recipients are present. The ratio of ICE bistability (i.e. ratio of horizontal to vertical transmission) is the outcome of a balance between fitness costs imposed by the ICE horizontal transmission process on the host cell, and selection for ICE distribution (i.e. ICE 'fitness'). From this emerges a picture of ICEs as elements that have adapted to a mostly confined life style within their host, but with a very effective and dynamic transfer from a subpopulation of dedicated cells.

Mots-clé
bistability, cellular differentiation, fitness cost, horizontal gene transfer
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
11/04/2017 18:37
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:27
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