Co-evolution between sociality and dispersal: The role of synergistic cooperative benefits.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_69EED9DF39EF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Co-evolution between sociality and dispersal: The role of synergistic cooperative benefits.
Périodique
Journal of Theoretical Biology
Auteur(s)
Purcell J., Brelsford A., Avilés L.
ISSN
1095-8541 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0022-5193
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
312C
Pages
44-54
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Explaining the evolution of sociality is challenging because social individuals face disadvantages that must be balanced by intrinsic benefits of living in a group. One potential route towards the evolution of sociality may emerge from the avoidance of dispersal, which can be risky in some environments. Although early studies found that local competition may cancel the benefits of cooperation in viscous populations, subsequent studies have identified conditions, such as the presence of kin recognition or specific demographic conditions, under which altruism will still spread. Most of these studies assume that the costs of cooperating outweigh the direct benefits (strong altruism). In nature, however, many organisms gain synergistic benefits from group living, which may counterbalance even costly altruistic behaviours. Here, we use an individual based model to investigate how dispersal and social behaviour co-evolve when social behaviours result in synergistic benefits that counterbalance the relative cost of altruism to a greater extent than assumed in previous models. When the cost of cooperation is high, selection for sociality responds strongly to the cost of dispersal. In particular, cooperation can begin to spread in a population when higher cooperation levels become correlated with lower dispersal tendencies within individuals. In contrast, less costly social behaviours are less sensitive to the cost of dispersal. In line with previous studies, we find that mechanisms of global population control also affect this relationship: when whole patches (groups) go extinct each generation, selection favours a relatively high dispersal propensity, and social behaviours evolve only when they are not very costly. If random individuals within groups experience mortality each generation to maintain a global carrying capacity, on the other hand, social behaviours spread and dispersal is reduced, even when the latter is not costly.
Mots-clé
Philopatry, Demography, Weak altruism, Non-additive effects
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
17/07/2012 23:21
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:24
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