Does brain activity at rest reflect adaptive strategies? Evidence from speech processing after cochlear implantation.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_6840D7BFCF75
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Does brain activity at rest reflect adaptive strategies? Evidence from speech processing after cochlear implantation.
Périodique
Cerebral Cortex
Auteur(s)
Strelnikov K., Rouger J., Demonet J.F., Lagleyre S., Fraysse B., Deguine O., Barone P.
ISSN
1460-2199 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1047-3211
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
20
Numéro
5
Pages
1217-1222
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In functional neuroimaging studies, task-related activity refers to the signal difference between the stimulation and rest conditions. We asked whether long-term changes in the sensory environment may affect brain activity at rest. To answer this question, we compared regional cerebral blood flow between a group of normally hearing controls and a group of cochlear-implanted (CI) deaf patients. Here we present evidence that long-term alteration of auditory experience, such as profound deafness followed by partial auditory recuperation through cochlear implantation, leads to functional cortical reorganizations at rest. Without any visual or auditory stimulation, CI subjects showed changes of cerebral blood flow in the visual, auditory cortex, Broca area, and in the posterior temporal cortex with an increment of activity in these areas from the time of activation of the implant to less than a year after the implantation.
Mots-clé
Acoustic Stimulation/methods, Adaptation, Physiological/physiology, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Brain/blood supply, Brain/physiopathology, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation/physiology, Cochlear Implantation/methods, Deafness/physiopathology, Deafness/rehabilitation, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Photic Stimulation/methods, Recognition (Psychology)/physiology, Rest, Speech/physiology, Statistics as Topic, Vocabulary
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 20:21
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:23
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