Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Respiratory Effort-Related Arousals in the General Population.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_67C29E36758F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Respiratory Effort-Related Arousals in the General Population.
Périodique
Journal of clinical sleep medicine
Auteur(s)
Ogna A., Tobback N., Andries D., Preisig M., Vollenweider P., Waeber G., Marques-Vidal P., Haba-Rubio J., Heinzer R.
ISSN
1550-9397 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1550-9389
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
15/08/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Numéro
8
Pages
1339-1345
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
To determine the prevalence and clinical associations of respiratory effort-related arousals (RERA) in a general population sample.
A total of 2,162 participants (51.2% women, 58.5 ± 11.0 years old, body mass index [BMI] 25.6 ± 4.2 kg/m <sup>2</sup> ) of a general population-based cohort (HypnoLaus, Switzerland) underwent full polysomnography at home. Each subject with a RERA index ≥ 5 events/h was compared with an age-, sex- and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI)-matched control without RERA.
A RERA index ≥ 5 events/h was present in 84 participants (3.8%; 95% confidence interval: 3.2-4.8%). In 17 participants (0.8%; 95% confidence interval: 0.5-1.3%), RERAs were the predominant sleep breathing disorder and only one of them complained of excessive daytime sleepiness. Compared to matched controls, subjects with a RERA index ≥ 5 events/h were similar in terms of BMI (26.5 ± 3.5 versus 26.3 ± 4.8 kg/m <sup>2</sup> , P = .73), neck circumference (38.5 ± 3.3 versus 37.6 ± 3.7 cm, P = .10) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (6.7 ± 3.7 versus 6.0 ± 3.7, P = .22). Also, no differences were found for hypertension (21.4% versus 27.4%, P = .47), diabetes (7.1% versus 7.1%, P = 1.00), or metabolic syndrome (31.0% versus 23.8%, P = .39).
In a middle-aged population-based cohort, the prevalence of a RERA index ≥ 5 events/h was low (3.8%) and was not associated with negative clinical outcomes when using the currently recommended scoring criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Mots-clé
RERA, cardiovascular risk, excessive daytime sleepiness, general population, polysomnography, sleep apnea, sleep-disordered breathing, upper airway resistance syndrome
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/09/2018 11:16
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:23
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