Further insight into adolescent personal identity statuses: Differences based on self- esteem, family climate, and family communication

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Albert Sznitman, et al. (in press, postprint_JoA).pdf (1543.69 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_671FA682DAB9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Further insight into adolescent personal identity statuses: Differences based on self- esteem, family climate, and family communication
Périodique
Journal of Adolescence
Auteur(s)
Albert Sznitman G., Zimmermann G., Van Petegem S.
ISSN
0140-1971
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2019
Volume
71
Pages
99-109
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Introduction: During adolescence, youngsters are faced with the challenging task of forming an identity. This process can be either supported or hindered by adolescents’ family context. The present study used a six-process model of personal identity including the five identity processes described by the dual-cycle model of identity (exploration in breadth, commitment making, exploration in depth, identification with commitment, and ruminative exploration) as well as a sixth identity process of reconsideration of commitment, commonly described in the three-factor model of identity. In the current investigation, we sought to evaluate how adolescents in identity statuses derived from this six-process model differed based on psychological adjustment, perceived family climate, and family communication. Method: A total of 1,105 Swiss adolescents (Mage = 15.08; 51% female) completed self-report questionnaires at one time point. Using a person-centered approach, identity statuses were empirically derived and unique profiles for each identity status were identified. Results: We identified six identity statuses: Achievement, Foreclosure, Ruminative Moratorium, Reconsidering Achievement, Troubled Diffusion, and Carefree Diffusion. Statuses with the highest degree of commitment showed the most positive profiles of psychological adjustment and perceived family climate, whereas those with the lowest levels of commitment demonstrated the most negative ones. Adolescents in the Reconsidering Achievement status, however, reported high levels of both parental support and psychological control. Conclusion: The use of the six-process model of identity allowed for the derivation of six identity statuses and provided further insight into how adolescents in different identity statuses confront identity-related issues in the context of their family.
Mots-clé
adolescence, adolescent disclosure, family climate, identity processes, identity statuses, self-esteem, parental solicitation
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/01/2019 16:34
Dernière modification de la notice
07/05/2019 7:08
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