Perception-related EEG is more sensitive to Alzheimer's disease effects than resting EEG.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_6552EFE836C7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Perception-related EEG is more sensitive to Alzheimer's disease effects than resting EEG.
Périodique
Neurobiology of Aging
Auteur(s)
Barzegaran E., van Damme B., Meuli R., Knyazeva M.G.
ISSN
1558-1497 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0197-4580
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
43
Pages
129-139
Langue
anglais
Résumé
To characterize the effects of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on cortical functional connectivity in perception, we analyzed interhemispheric lagged synchronization (ILS) in the source space of high-density EEG recorded in aged controls and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or AD while they viewed collinear and noncollinear bilateral moving gratings. Beta-band ILS was lower in aMCI and AD compared with controls in a large region centered on BA39. As previously reported, in young adults, collinear iso-oriented gratings versus noncollinear gratings synchronizes EEG reflecting perceptual grouping. Only aged controls showed the expected beta-band ILS increase originating in the dorsal visual stream (BA18). The aMCI group only showed a theta-band increase in an adjacent region (BA19). In AD patients, there was no ILS increase. Regression analysis revealed that the posterior callosal area and EEG slowing predict reduction of beta but not emergence of theta ILS response. Considering that we found no between-group differences in resting ILS, perception-related EEG appears to be more sensitive to AD effects, including ILS signs of neurodegeneration and compensation.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/06/2016 17:16
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:21
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