Lexical learning of the English language: a PET study in healthy French subjects.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_654528C7CCDF
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Lexical learning of the English language: a PET study in healthy French subjects.
Périodique
Neuroimage
Auteur(s)
Raboyeau G., Marie N., Balduyck S., Gros H., Démonet J.F., Cardebat D.
ISSN
1053-8119 (Print)
ISSN-L
1053-8119
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
22
Numéro
4
Pages
1808-1818
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To investigate the neural correlates of word learning in adults, 10 right-handed French subjects who had learned English without mastering it performed an English and a French naming task during two PET sessions, one before (PET1) and the second after (PET2) a 4-week lexical training in English. Behavioral performance was collected during the two PET exams and 2 months after (T3). At T2, performance on English naming increased in all subjects; this improvement persisted at T3, with no correlation between English performance at T2 and T3. Cerebral activation during French naming mainly showed a left frontal temporal network. The pattern specifically associated with English lexical learning included, in addition to the anterior cingulate cortex involved in attentional processing and BAs 4/6 reflecting speech output, the right cerebellum and the left insular cortex that are linked to speech gesture learning, and the right medial temporal regions, likely to reflect the involvement of episodic memory during verbal learning. Correlations between English T2/T1 performance and English T2/T1 rCBF changes reinforced the hypothesis of intervention of episodic memory since they interested right frontal, hippocampal, and lateral temporal regions. 'Predictive' correlations between English T3/T2 performance and English T2/T1 rCBF changes showed, in good reminders, increased activities in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus and middle temporal cortex probably related to efficient semantic storage of learned words.
Mots-clé
Adult, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Cerebral Cortex/radionuclide imaging, Dominance, Cerebral/physiology, Female, Hippocampus/physiology, Hippocampus/radionuclide imaging, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Male, Middle Aged, Multilingualism, Reference Values, Regional Blood Flow/physiology, Retention (Psychology)/physiology, Statistics as Topic, Tomography, Emission-Computed, Verbal Learning/physiology, Vocabulary
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 19:42
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 17:51
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