Comparing alternative methods for holding virgin honey bee queens for one week in mailing cages before mating.

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Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_653514323C82.P001.pdf (894.67 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_653514323C82
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Comparing alternative methods for holding virgin honey bee queens for one week in mailing cages before mating.
Périodique
PLoS One
Auteur(s)
Bigio G., Grüter C., Ratnieks F.L.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Numéro
11
Pages
e50150
Langue
anglais
Résumé
In beekeeping, queen honey bees are often temporarily kept alive in cages. We determined the survival of newly-emerged virgin honey bee queens every day for seven days in an experiment that simultaneously investigated three factors: queen cage type (wooden three-hole or plastic), attendant workers (present or absent) and food type (sugar candy, honey, or both). Ten queens were tested in each of the 12 combinations. Queens were reared using standard beekeeping methods (Doolittle/grafting) and emerged from their cells into vials held in an incubator at 34C. All 12 combinations gave high survival (90 or 100%) for three days but only one method (wooden cage, with attendants, honey) gave 100% survival to day seven. Factors affecting queen survival were analysed. Across all combinations, attendant bees significantly increased survival (18% vs. 53%, p<0.001). In addition, there was an interaction between food type and cage type (p<0.001) with the honey and plastic cage combination giving reduced survival. An additional group of queens was reared and held for seven days using the best method, and then directly introduced using smoke into queenless nucleus colonies that had been dequeened five days previously. Acceptance was high (80%, 8/10) showing that this combination is also suitable for preparing queens for introduction into colonies. Having a simple method for keeping newly-emerged virgin queens alive in cages for one week and acceptable for introduction into queenless colonies will be useful in honey bee breeding. In particular, it facilitates the screening of many queens for genetic or phenotypic characteristics when only a small proportion meets the desired criteria. These can then be introduced into queenless hives for natural mating or insemination, both of which take place when queens are one week old.
Mots-clé
UI="D000818">Animals, UI="D056630">Beekeeping/UI="Q000379">methods, UI="D001516">Bees/UI="Q000502">physiology, UI="D001947">Breeding/UI="Q000379">methods, UI="D004032">Diet, UI="D005260">Female, UI="D006799">Housing, Animal, UI="D016014">Linear Models, UI="D012931">Social Environment, UI="D016019">Survival Analysis
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
21/02/2014 10:20
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:21
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