Symptoms, comorbidity, and clinical course of depression in immigrants: Putting psychopathology in context.

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_6411A2F3B4C7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Symptoms, comorbidity, and clinical course of depression in immigrants: Putting psychopathology in context.
Périodique
Journal of Affective Disorders
Auteur(s)
Saraga M., Gholam-Rezaee M., Preisig M.
ISSN
1573-2517 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0165-0327
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
151
Numéro
2
Pages
795-799
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Migration is considered a depression risk factor when associated with psychosocial adversity, but its impact on depression's clinical characteristics has not been specifically studied. We compared 85 migrants to 34 controls, examining depression's severity, symptomatology, comorbidity profile and clinical course.
METHOD: A MINI interview modified to assess course characteristics was used to assign DSM-IV axis I diagnoses; medical files were used for Somatoform Disorders. Severity was assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg scale. Wherever possible, we adjusted comparisons for age and gender using logistic and linear regressions.
RESULTS: Depression in migrants was characterized by higher comorbidity (mostly somatoform and anxiety disorders), higher severity, and a non-recurrent, chronic course.
LIMITATIONS: Our sample comes from a single center, and should be replicated in other health care facilities and other countries. Somatoform disorder diagnoses were solely based on file-content.
CONCLUSION: Depression in migrants presented as a complex, chronic clinical picture. Most of our migrant patients experienced significant psychosocial adversity before and after migration: beyond cultural issues, our results suggest that psychosocial adversity impacts on the clinical expression of depression. Our study also suggests that migration associated with psychosocial adversity might play a specific etiological role, resulting in a distinct clinical picture, questioning the DSM-IV unitarian model of depression. The chronic course might indicate a resistance to standard therapeutic regimen and hints at the necessity of developing specific treatment strategies, adapted to the individual patients and their specific context.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
29/10/2013 15:44
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:20
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