Bidirectional shifts in colony queen number in a socially polymorphic ant population.

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Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_62DA013E8255.P001.pdf (623.95 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_62DA013E8255
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Bidirectional shifts in colony queen number in a socially polymorphic ant population.
Périodique
Evolution
Auteur(s)
Purcell J., Chapuisat M.
ISSN
1558-5646 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0014-3820
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
67
Numéro
4
Pages
1169-1180
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The breeding system of social organisms affects many important aspects of social life. Some species vary greatly in the number of breeders per group, but the mechanisms and selective pressures contributing to the maintenance of this polymorphism in social structure remain poorly understood. Here, we take advantage of a genetic dataset that spans 15 years to investigate the dynamics of colony queen number within a socially polymorphic ant species. Our study population of Formica selysi has single- and multiple-queen colonies. We found that the social structure of this species is somewhat flexible: on average, each year 3.2% of the single-queen colonies became polygynous, and conversely 1.4% of the multiple-queen colonies became monogynous. The annualized queen replacement rates were 10.3% and 11.9% for single- and multiple-queen colonies, respectively. New queens were often but not always related to previous colony members. At the population level, the social polymorphism appeared stable. There was no genetic differentiation between single- and multiple-queen colonies at eight microsatellite loci, suggesting ongoing gene flow between social forms. Overall, the regular and bidirectional changes in queen number indicate that social structure is a labile trait in F. selysi, with neither form being favored within a time-frame of 15 years.
Mots-clé
Formicinae, hymenoptera, monogyny, parentage analysis, phenotypic plasticity, polygyny, social evolution
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
09/09/2012 17:46
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:19
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