Hallucinations et illusions visuelles, des symptomes souvent meconnus du praticien. [Visual hallucinations and illusions, symptoms frequently misdiagnosed by the practitioner]

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5E4E1D31C204
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Hallucinations et illusions visuelles, des symptomes souvent meconnus du praticien. [Visual hallucinations and illusions, symptoms frequently misdiagnosed by the practitioner]
Périodique
Klinische Monatsblatter fur Augenheilkunde
Auteur(s)
Borruat  F. X.
ISSN
0023-2165 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/1999
Volume
214
Numéro
5
Pages
324-7
Notes
English Abstract
Journal Article
Review --- Old month value: May
Résumé
INTRODUCTION: Visual hallucinations or illusions are not a rare symptom. However, they are often unrecognized. Unawareness of the meaning of these symptoms often mislead both the patient and his physician. PURPOSE: To define and describe the types of visual illusions and hallucinations which can be commonly encountered in neuro-ophthalmological practice. METHODS: Overview article. RESULTS: Hallucinations are a perception not based on sensory input, whereas illusions are a misinterpretation of a correct sensory input. Both phenomenon can be due to medication or drug, or to an altered mental status. Visual hallucinations can be formed (objects, people) or unformed (light, geometric figures). They can be generated either by a lesion on the antechiasmatic pathway, by a seizure phenomenon, by a migrainous phenomenon, or by a release phenomenon secondary to visual differentiation. Investigations will be directed towards a retinopathy, an optic neuropathy, a chiasmal or retrochiasmal lesion, or a bilateral antechiasmal lesion (Charles Bonnet syndrome). Visual illusions include meta-morphopsias, micro- macropsias, polyopia, palinopsia (visual perseveration), achromatopsia, Pulfrich phenomenon, or subjective vertical deviation. Illusions can be due to lesions of the retina, the optic nerve, the visual cortex (primary or associative), or the graviceptive pathways. CONCLUSIONS: As most patients do not spontaneously mention their symptoms, history taking is essential. The first step is to rule out medication or an altered mental status as the possible cause of these symptoms. Then, careful visual function examination should provide a good insight in the location of the lesion.
Mots-clé
Diagnosis, Differential Hallucinations/*diagnosis/etiology Hemianopsia/diagnosis/etiology Humans *Optical Illusions Patient Care Team Perceptual Disorders/*diagnosis/etiology Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis/etiology Vision Disorders/*diagnosis/etiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
28/01/2008 12:37
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:16
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