Intraosseous meningioma: a rare cause of chronic optic neuropathy and exophthalmos

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5E032C62EAC0
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Etude de cas (case report): rapporte une observation et la commente brièvement.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Intraosseous meningioma: a rare cause of chronic optic neuropathy and exophthalmos
Périodique
Klinische Monatsblatter fur Augenheilkunde
Auteur(s)
Henchoz  L., Borruat  F. X.
ISSN
0023-2165 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2004
Volume
221
Numéro
5
Pages
414-7
Notes
Case Reports
Journal Article --- Old month value: May
Résumé
BACKGROUND: The association of optic neuropathy, proptosis and chorioretinal folds is highly suggestive of an orbitopathy. Usual etiologies include an inflammatory orbitopathy, optic nerve sheath meningioma, sphenoid wing meningioma, exterioration of a sinus disorder, or an orbital tumor be it primary or secondary. HISTORY AND SIGNS: A 40-year-old man treated for systemic hypertension complained of decreased vision and floaters in his right eye. Initial examination revealed decreased visual acuity to 20/50 of the right eye with a slight dyschromatopsia, but a lack of afferent pupillary defect and normal visual fields. Fundus examination showed the presence of a slightly swollen right optic disc and chorioretinal folds. A diagnosis of presumed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy was made. Symptoms persisted and, five months later, right proptosis was noted. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a diffuse thickening of the parieto-temporal bone and the greater wing of the sphenoid bone on the right side. Radiological differential diagnosis included fibrous dysplasia and metastasis. THERAPY AND OUTCOME: Bone biopsy revealed a grade I intraosseous meningioma. Conservative management was chosen because the lesion was too extensive to be resected and radiotherapy is usually not efficient on grade I meningiomas. CONCLUSIONS: Intraosseous meningiomas are benign tumors which are due to meningeal cells entrapment during vaginal delivery. It is a rare tumor of slow progression. Therapy usually consists of resection and cranioplasty and/or radiotherapy. In the present case, decompression of the optic canal remains feasible in case of further visual loss.
Mots-clé
Adult Biopsy Diagnosis, Differential Exophthalmos/diagnosis/*etiology Fluorescein Angiography Humans Magnetic Resonance Imaging Male Meningeal Neoplasms/*complications/diagnosis Meningioma/*complications/diagnosis Nerve Compression Syndromes/diagnosis/etiology Optic Nerve Diseases/diagnosis/*etiology *Parietal Bone/pathology Skull Neoplasms/*complications/diagnosis *Sphenoid Bone/pathology *Temporal Bone/pathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
28/01/2008 12:37
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:16
Données d'usage