Massive genetic introgression in threatened northern crested newts (Triturus cristatus) by an invasive congener (T. carnifex) in Western Switzerland

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5DDDE2D5EA70
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Massive genetic introgression in threatened northern crested newts (Triturus cristatus) by an invasive congener (T. carnifex) in Western Switzerland
Périodique
Conservation Genetics
Auteur(s)
Dufresnes C., Pellet J., Bettinelli-Riccardi S., Thiébaud J., Perrin N., Fumagalli L.
ISSN
1566-0621
ISSN-L
1566-0621
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
17
Numéro
4
Pages
839-846
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Genetic pollution through introgressive hybridization of local species by exotic relatives is a major, yet neglected aspect of biological invasions, particularly in amphibians where human introductions are frequent. In Western Switzerland, crested newts make an interesting case: the Italian species Triturus carnifex was introduced at least a century ago within the range of the native and threatened T. cristatus. To understand the genetic consequences of this introduction and inform wildlife management authorities, we conducted a genetic survey on the remaining northern crested newt populations known in the area, using newly-developed species-diagnostic nuclear (microsatellites) and mitochondrial (control region) DNA markers. We documented massive nuclear introgression by the T. carnifex genome, which has completely replaced T. cristatus in most populations, especially in the Geneva area where the introduction was originally reported. However, many of these individuals retained the ancestral T. cristatus mtDNA, which could be explained by asymmetric introgression between the two species, stemming from demographic and/or selective processes. Analyses of genetic diversity support multiple events of T. carnifex releases, most-likely of proximate North Italian origin. We pinpointed the last indigenous populations in the region and recommend to prioritize their protection. Our study demonstrates the invasive potential of introduced taxa through introgressive hybridization, alerts about the underestimated rate of illegal amphibian translocations, and emphasizes the need for genetic analyses to monitor such invasions.
Mots-clé
Conservation, Asymmetric reproductive isolation, Hybridization, Invasive species, Amphibian, Microsatellites, mtDNA
Web of science
Création de la notice
15/02/2016 20:11
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:15
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