"The mute who can sing": a cortical stimulation study on singing.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5DC63CA2AD53
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Etude de cas (case report): rapporte une observation et la commente brièvement.
Collection
Publications
Titre
"The mute who can sing": a cortical stimulation study on singing.
Périodique
Journal of Neurosurgery
Auteur(s)
Roux F.E., Borsa S., Démonet J.F.
ISSN
0022-3085 (Print)
ISSN-L
0022-3085
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
110
Numéro
2
Pages
282-288
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish. PDF type: Clinical article
Résumé
OBJECT: In an attempt to identify cortical areas involved in singing in addition to language areas, the authors used a singing task during direct cortical mapping in 5 patients who were amateur singers and had undergone surgery for brain tumors. The organization of the cortical areas involved in language and singing was analyzed in relation with these surgical data.
METHODS: One left-handed and 4 right-handed patients with brain tumors in left (2 cases) and right (3 cases) hemispheres and no significant language or singing deficits underwent surgery with the "awake surgery" technique. All patients had a special interest in singing and were involved in amateur singing activities. They were tested using naming, reading, and singing tasks.
RESULTS: Outside primary sensorimotor areas, singing interferences were rare and were exclusively localized in small cortical areas (< 1 cm(2)). A clear distinction was found between speech and singing in the Broca region. In the Broca region, no singing interference was found in areas in which interference in naming and reading tasks were detected. Conversely, a specific singing interference was found in nondominant middle frontal gyri in one patient. This interference consisted of abrupt singing arrest without apparent face, mouth, and tongue contraction. Finally, nonspecific singing interferences were found in the right and left precentral gyri in all patients (probably by interference in final articulatory mechanisms of singing).
CONCLUSIONS: Dissociations between speech and singing found outside primary sensorimotor areas showed that these 2 functions use, in some cortical stages, different cerebral pathways.
Mots-clé
Adult, Aged, Brain Mapping/methods, Brain Neoplasms/surgery, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Dominance, Cerebral/physiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Music, Neuronavigation, Prospective Studies, Reading, Speech/physiology, Voice/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 20:06
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 17:36
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