An investigation of prototypical and atypical within-category vowels and non-speech analogues on cortical auditory evoked related potentials (AERPs) in 9 year old children.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5C0BAFC05289
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
An investigation of prototypical and atypical within-category vowels and non-speech analogues on cortical auditory evoked related potentials (AERPs) in 9 year old children.
Périodique
International Journal of Psychophysiology
Auteur(s)
Bruder J., Leppänen P.H., Bartling J., Csépe V., Démonet J.F., Schulte-Körne G.
ISSN
1872-7697 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0167-8760
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
79
Numéro
2
Pages
106-117
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The present study examined cortical auditory evoked related potentials (AERPs) for the P1-N250 and MMN components in children 9 years of age. The first goal was to investigate whether AERPs respond differentially to vowels and complex tones, and the second goal was to explore how prototypical language formant structures might be reflected in these early auditory processing stages. Stimuli were two synthetic within-category vowels (/y/), one of which was preferred by adult German listeners ("prototypical-vowel"), and analogous complex tones. P1 strongly distinguished vowels from tones, revealing larger amplitudes for the more difficult to discriminate but phonetically richer vowel stimuli. Prototypical language phoneme status did not reliably affect AERPs; however P1 amplitudes elicited by the prototypical-vowel correlated robustly with the ability to correctly identify two prototypical-vowels presented in succession as "same" (r=-0.70) and word reading fluency (r=-0.63). These negative correlations suggest that smaller P1 amplitudes elicited by the prototypical-vowel predict enhanced accuracy when judging prototypical-vowel "sameness" and increased word reading speed. N250 and MMN did not differentiate between vowels and tones and showed no correlations to behavioural measures.
Mots-clé
Acoustic Stimulation/methods, Auditory Perception/physiology, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Child, Contingent Negative Variation/physiology, Discrimination (Psychology), Electroencephalography/methods, Evoked Potentials, Auditory/physiology, Humans, Judgment/physiology, Phonetics, Psycholinguistics, Reaction Time/physiology, Reading, Statistics as Topic
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/03/2013 20:29
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 17:33
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