Nurse interventions to improve medication adherence among discharged older adults: a systematic review.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_5B09FFAD08D7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Nurse interventions to improve medication adherence among discharged older adults: a systematic review.
Périodique
Age and ageing
Auteur(s)
Verloo H., Chiolero A., Kiszio B., Kampel T., Santschi V.
ISSN
1468-2834 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0002-0729
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/09/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
46
Numéro
5
Pages
747-754
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
discharged older adult inpatients are often prescribed numerous medications. However, they only take about half of their medications and many stop treatments entirely. Nurse interventions could improve medication adherence among this population.
to conduct a systematic review of trials that assessed the effects of nursing interventions to improve medication adherence among discharged, home-dwelling and older adults.
we conducted a systematic review according to the methods in the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook and reported results according to the PRISMA statement. We searched for controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and randomised CCTs (RCTs), published up to 8 November 2016 (using electronic databases, grey literature and hand searching), that evaluated the effects of nurse interventions conducted alone or in collaboration with other health professionals to improve medication adherence among discharged older adults. Medication adherence was defined as the extent to which a patient takes medication as prescribed.
out of 1,546 records identified, 82 full-text papers were evaluated and 14 studies were included-11 RCTs and 2 CCTs. Overall, 2,028 patients were included (995 in intervention groups; 1,033 in usual-care groups). Interventions were nurse-led in seven studies and nurse-collaborative in seven more. In nine studies, adherence was higher in the intervention group than in the usual-care group, with the difference reaching statistical significance in eight studies. There was no substantial difference in increased medication adherence whether interventions were nurse-led or nurse-collaborative. Four of the 14 studies were of relatively high quality.
nurse-led and nurse-collaborative interventions moderately improved adherence among discharged older adults. There is a need for large, well-designed studies using highly reliable tools for measuring medication adherence.
Mots-clé
Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging/psychology, Delivery of Health Care, Integrated, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Male, Medication Adherence, Middle Aged, Nurse's Role, Nurses, Patient Care Team, Patient Discharge, Polypharmacy, medication adherence, nurse intervention, nurse-collaborative interventions, nurse-led interventions, older people, systematic review
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
23/05/2017 16:21
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:14
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