Chronic rhinoviral infection in lung transplant recipients.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_58FD275DD194
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Chronic rhinoviral infection in lung transplant recipients.
Périodique
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Auteur(s)
Kaiser L., Aubert J.D., Pache J.C., Deffernez C., Rochat T., Garbino J., Wunderli W., Meylan P., Yerly S., Perrin L., Letovanec I., Nicod L., Tapparel C., Soccal P.M.
ISSN
1073-449X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
174
Numéro
12
Pages
1392-1399
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Case Reports ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Résumé
RATIONALE: Lung transplant recipients are particularly at risk of complications from rhinovirus, the most frequent respiratory virus circulating in the community. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether lung transplant recipients can be chronically infected by rhinovirus and the potential clinical impact. METHODS: We first identified an index case, in which rhinovirus was isolated repeatedly, and conducted detailed molecular analysis to determine whether this was related to a unique strain or to re-infection episodes. Transbronchial biopsies were used to assess the presence of rhinovirus in the lung parenchyma. The incidence of chronic rhinoviral infections and potential clinical impact was assessed prospectively in a cohort of 68 lung transplant recipients during 19 mo by screening of bronchoalveolar lavages. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We describe 3 lung transplant recipients with graft dysfunctions in whom rhinovirus was identified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in upper and lower respiratory specimens over a 12-mo period. In two cases, rhinovirus was repeatedly isolated in culture. The persistence of a unique strain in each case was confirmed by sequence analysis of the 5'NCR and VP1 gene. In the index case, rhinovirus was detected in the lower respiratory parenchyma. In the cohort of lung transplant recipients, rhinoviral infections were documented in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens of 10 recipients, and 2 presented with a persistent infection. CONCLUSIONS: Rhinoviral infection can be persistent in lung transplant recipients with graft dysfunction, and the virus can be detected in the lung parenchyma. Given the potential clinical impact, chronic rhinoviral infection needs to be considered in lung transplant recipients.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Chronic Disease, Common Cold, Female, Humans, Lung, Lung Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Rhinovirus
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
21/01/2008 13:54
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:12
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