Thermoregulation and microhabitat choice in the polymorphic asp viper (Vipera aspis).

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_583B5F3F788C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Thermoregulation and microhabitat choice in the polymorphic asp viper (Vipera aspis).
Périodique
Journal of Thermal Biology
Auteur(s)
Muri D., Schuerch J., Trim N., Golay J., Baillifard A., El Taher A., Dubey S.
ISSN
0306-4565 (Print)
ISSN-L
0306-4565
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
53
Pages
107-112
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In ectotherms, thermoregulation strongly depends on environmental conditions, as well as on intrinsic factors, such as skin colour. Indeed, due to its physical properties, melanin pigments allow melanistic morphs to benefit of a more efficient thermoregulation compared to non-melanistic ones. Despite thermal benefits of melanism have often been highlighted under experimental conditions, such field data remain scarce. In this study, we investigated the influence of colouration on body temperature and microhabitat choice in a montane population of colour polymorphic asp viper (Vipera aspis) characterized by a strong presence of melanism (64%). Results highlighted a difference in internal body temperature, but only within gravid females, with melanistic individuals having higher body temperatures compared to non-melanistic ones. No differences were found when considering both sexes. We also showed that melanistic and non-melanistic vipers were found in different microhabitat types, i.e. melanistic snakes used areas marked by a scarcer sun exposure and by higher vegetation cover compared to non-melanistic ones. This result has important implications. Indeed, besides providing a possible explanation for the lack of difference in body temperature (except for gravid females), it confirms that melanistic individuals can potentially use their efficient thermoregulation in order to inhabit less exposed and thermally unfavourable microhabitats.
Mots-clé
Animal Distribution, Animals, Body Temperature, Ecosystem, Female, Male, Melanins/metabolism, Skin Pigmentation, Viperidae/metabolism, Viperidae/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
30/06/2015 18:05
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:12
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