Background levels of polychlorinated biphenyls in the U.S. population.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_57C7E5B3AC60
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Background levels of polychlorinated biphenyls in the U.S. population.
Périodique
The Science of the total environment
Auteur(s)
Hopf N.B., Ruder A.M., Succop P.
ISSN
1879-1026 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0048-9697
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/12/2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
407
Numéro
24
Pages
6109-6119
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures are encountered by the general public by eating contaminated food or living near a previously operating PCB factory or hazardous waste site. PCBs affect the immune, reproductive, nervous, and endocrine systems and are carcinogens. PCBs were banned in the United States in 1977. For public health, it is important to be able to estimate individual risk, especially for vulnerable populations, to monitor the decline in risk over time and to alert the public health community if spikes occur in PCB exposures, by measuring serum PCB levels. The historical decline in PCB exposures cannot be documented within a repeatedly tested general population, since there is no such population. Therefore, our aim was to model serum PCB levels in the US general population over time using published data.
Models were developed based on 45 publications providing 16,914 background PCB levels in sera collected 1963-2003. Multiple linear regression and exponential decay were used to model the summary PCB levels.
Background levels of higher-chlorinated PCBs (five or more chlorines) in sera increased before 1979 and decreased after 1979; a quadratic model was the best fit. However, the exponential decay model explained better the low PCB serum levels still seen in the general population. For lower-chlorinated serum PCBs, no increase or decrease was shown (1.7ppb for all years).
Limitations for both models were lack of repeated measures, non-randomly selected study participants, selected years, concentration on geographic areas centered on PCB waste sites, lack of adjustment for BMI or for laboratory methods. Despite the limitations, this analysis shows that background PCB levels in the general population are still of concern. Future work should focus on uncertainties governing how to interpret the levels with respect to possible long term health effects.

Mots-clé
Environmental Exposure/analysis, Environmental Exposure/statistics & numerical data, Environmental Pollutants/blood, Humans, Polychlorinated Biphenyls/blood, United States
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
06/10/2011 16:51
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 17:24
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