A better understanding of ecological conditions for Leontopodium alpinum Cassini in the Swiss Alps

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_56CDDE77A950
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
A better understanding of ecological conditions for Leontopodium alpinum Cassini in the Swiss Alps
Périodique
Folia Geobotanica
Auteur(s)
Ischer M., Dubuis A., Keller R., Vittoz P.
ISSN
1874-9348 (electronic)
ISSN-L
1211-9520
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
49
Numéro
4
Pages
541-558
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Although Leontopodium alpinum is considered to be threatened in many countries, only limited scientific information about its autecology is available. In this study, we aim to define the most important ecological factors which influence the distribution of L. alpinum in the Swiss Alps. These were assessed at the national scale using species distribution models based on topoclimatic predictors and at the community scale using exhaustive plant inventories. The latter were analysed using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis, and the results were interpreted using ecological indicator values.
L. alpinum was found almost exclusively on base-rich bedrocks (limestone and ultramaphic rocks). The species distribution models showed that the available moisture (dry regions, mostly in the Inner Alps), elevation (mostly above 2000 m.a.s.l.) and slope (mostly >30°) were the most important predictors. The relevés showed that L. alpinum is present in a wide range of plant communities, all subalpine-alpine open grasslands, with a low grass cover. As a light-demanding and short species, L. alpinum requires light at ground level; hence, it can only grow in open, nutrient-poor grasslands. These conditions are met in dry conditions (dry, summer-warm climate, rocky and draining soil, south-facing aspect and/or steep slope), at high elevations, on oligotrophic soils and/or on windy ridges. Base-rich soils appear to also be essential, although it is still unclear if this corresponds to physiological or ecological (lower competition) requirements.
Mots-clé
alpine grasslands, autecology, phytosociology, species distribution models, Switzerland
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
04/11/2013 12:43
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 18:51
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