Risk Factors for Incisional and Organ Space Surgical Site Infections After Liver Resection are Different.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_53517C881B15
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Risk Factors for Incisional and Organ Space Surgical Site Infections After Liver Resection are Different.
Périodique
World Journal of Surgery
Auteur(s)
Kokudo T., Uldry E., Demartines N., Halkic N.
ISSN
1432-2323 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0364-2313
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
39
Numéro
5
Pages
1185-1192
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common cause of major morbidity after liver resection. This study aimed to identify the risk factors for incisional and organ/space SSIs after liver resection.
METHODS: Our liver surgery database was retrospectively analyzed for patients treated between January 2009 and November 2012 in a tertiary care Swiss hospital. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space SSIs.
RESULTS: In a total of 226 patients, SSI incidences were 12.8 % (incisional), 4.0 % (organ/space), and 1.8 % (both). Univariate analysis showed that incisional SSIs were associated with high American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores, preoperative anemia, hypoalbuminemia, low prothrombin time, viral or alcoholic chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and prolonged operation times. Organ/space SSIs were associated with high rates of red blood cell transfusions, concomitant bowel surgery, and prolonged operation times. Multivariate analysis revealed that risk factors for incisional SSIs were anemia [odds ratio (OR) 2.82], high ASA scores (OR 2.88), presence of hepatitis or cirrhosis (OR 5.07), and prolonged operation times (OR 9.61). The only risk factor for organ/space SSIs was concomitant bowel surgery (OR 5.53). Hospital stays were similar in organ/space and incisional SSI groups, but significantly longer for those with both organ/space and incisional SSIs.
CONCLUSIONS: High ASA scores, anemia, chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis, and prolonged operations increased the risk of incisional SSIs; concomitant bowel surgery increased the risk of organ/space SSI. Specific precautions to prevent organ/space and incisional SSIs may shorten hospital stays.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
01/05/2015 17:36
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 17:15
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