Ionotropic Receptor-dependent moist and dry cells control hygrosensation in Drosophila.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: elife-26654-v2.pdf (3730.01 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_53097AE12AE5
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Ionotropic Receptor-dependent moist and dry cells control hygrosensation in Drosophila.
Périodique
eLife
Auteur(s)
Knecht Z.A., Silbering A.F., Cruz J., Yang L., Croset V., Benton R., Garrity P.A.
ISSN
2050-084X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2050-084X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
16/06/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
6
Pages
e26654
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Insects use hygrosensation (humidity sensing) to avoid desiccation and, in vectors such as mosquitoes, to locate vertebrate hosts. Sensory neurons activated by either dry or moist air ('dry cells' and 'moist cells') have been described in many insects, but their behavioral roles and the molecular basis of their hygrosensitivity remain unclear. We recently reported that <i>Drosophila</i> hygrosensation relies on three Ionotropic Receptors (IRs) required for dry cell function: IR25a, IR93a and IR40a (Knecht et al., 2016). Here, we discover <i>Drosophila</i> moist cells and show that they require IR25a and IR93a together with IR68a, a conserved, but orphan IR. Both IR68a- and IR40a-dependent pathways drive hygrosensory behavior: each is important for dry-seeking by hydrated flies and together they underlie moist-seeking by dehydrated flies. These studies reveal that humidity sensing in <i>Drosophila</i> , and likely other insects, involves the combined activity of two molecularly related but neuronally distinct hygrosensing systems.
Mots-clé
Animals, Behavior, Animal, Drosophila/physiology, Drosophila Proteins/metabolism, Humidity, Receptors, Ionotropic Glutamate/metabolism, Sensory Receptor Cells/physiology, D. melanogaster, IR25a, desiccation, humidity, humidity sensing, iGluR, neuroscience, sensory transduction
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
27/06/2017 17:35
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 15:08
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