Molecular phylogeny and timing of diversification in Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae).

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_51EA1F748940.P001.pdf (3676.91 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_51EA1F748940
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Molecular phylogeny and timing of diversification in Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae).
Périodique
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Vuataz L., Rutschmann S., Monaghan M.T., Sartori M.
ISSN
1471-2148 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2148
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Volume
16
Numéro
1
Pages
194
Langue
anglais
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Larvae of the Holarctic mayfly genus Rhithrogena Eaton, 1881 (Ephemeroptera, Heptageniidae) are a diverse and abundant member of stream and river communities and are routinely used as bio-indicators of water quality. Rhithrogena is well diversified in the European Alps, with a number of locally endemic species, and several cryptic species have been recently detected. While several informal species groups are morphologically well defined, a lack of reliable characters for species identification considerably hampers their study. Their relationships, origin, timing of speciation and mechanisms promoting their diversification in the Alps are unknown.
RESULTS: Here we present a species-level phylogeny of Rhithrogena in Europe using two mitochondrial and three nuclear gene regions. To improve sampling in a genus with many cryptic species, individuals were selected for analysis according to a recent DNA-based taxonomy rather than traditional nomenclature. A coalescent-based species tree and a reconstruction based on a supermatrix approach supported five of the species groups as monophyletic. A molecular clock, mapped on the most resolved phylogeny and calibrated using published mitochondrial evolution rates for insects, suggested an origin of Alpine Rhithrogena in the Oligocene/Miocene boundary. A diversification analysis that included simulation of missing species indicated a constant speciation rate over time, rather than any pronounced periods of rapid speciation. Ancestral state reconstructions provided evidence for downstream diversification in at least two species groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Our species-level analyses of five gene regions provide clearer definitions of species groups within European Rhithrogena. A constant speciation rate over time suggests that the paleoclimatic fluctuations, including the Pleistocene glaciations, did not significantly influence the tempo of diversification of Alpine species. A downstream diversification trend in the hybrida and alpestris species groups supports a previously proposed headwater origin hypothesis for aquatic insects.
Mots-clé
Dated phylogeny, Speciation, Diversification, Lineage-through-time, Pleistocene glaciations, Freshwater insects, Headwater, Mayfly, Ephemeroptera
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/10/2016 13:38
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 18:36
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