Redox dysregulation and oxidative stress in schizophrenia: genetic and functional anomalies of glutathione synthesis in patients and experimental models involving GABA interneurons and NMDA receptors

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_50E30C871E1E
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Redox dysregulation and oxidative stress in schizophrenia: genetic and functional anomalies of glutathione synthesis in patients and experimental models involving GABA interneurons and NMDA receptors
Titre de la conférence
26th Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum Congress (CINP), Munich, GERMANY, JUL 13-17, 2008
Auteur(s)
Cuenod M., Do K.Q.
ISBN
1461-1457
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Série
International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Pages
38
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Objective: Converging evidence speak in favor of an abnormal susceptibility to oxidative stress in schizophrenia. A decreased level of glutathione (GSH), the principal non-protein antioxidant and redox regulator, was observed both in cerebrospinal-fluid and prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients (Do et al., 2000).
Results: Schizophrenia patients have an abnormal GSH synthesis most likely of genetic origin: Two independent case-control studies showed a significant association between schizophrenia and a GAG trinucleotide repeat (TNR) polymorphism in the GSH key synthesizing enzyme glutamate-cysteine-ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) gene. The most common TNR genotype 7/7 was more frequent in controls, whereas the rarest TNR genotype 8/8 was three times more frequent in patients. The disease-associated genotypes correlated with a decrease in GCLC protein expression, GCL activity and GSH content. Such a redox dysregulation during development could underlie the structural and functional anomalies in connectivity: In experimental models, GSH deficit induced anomalies similar to those observed in patients. (a) morphology: In animal models with GSH deficit during the development we observed in prefrontal cortex a decreased dendritic spines density in pyramidal cells and an abnormal development of parvalbumine (but not of calretinine) immunoreactive GABA interneurones in anterior cingulate cortex. (b) physiology: GSH depletion in hippocampal slices induces NMDA receptors hypofunction and an impairment of long term potentiation. In addition, GSH deficit affected the modulation of dopamine on NMDA-induced Ca 2+ response in cultured cortical neurons. While dopamine enhanced NMDA responses in control neurons, it depressed NMDA responses in GSH-depleted neurons. Antagonist of D2-, but not D1-receptors, prevented this depression, a mechanism contributing to the efficacy of antipsychotics. The redox sensitive ryanodine receptors and L-type calcium channels underlie these observations. (c) cognition: Developing rats with low [GSH] and high dopamine lead deficit in olfactory integration and in object recognition which appears earlier in males that females, in analogy to the delay of the psychosis onset between man and woman.
Conclusion: These clinical and experimental evidence, combined with the favorable outcome of a clinical trial with N-Acetyl Cysteine, a GSH precursor, on both the negative symptoms (Berk et al., submitted) and the mismatch negativity in an auditory oddball paradigm supported the proposal that a GSH synthesis impairment of genetic origin represent, among other factors, one major risk factor in schizophrenia.
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
19/02/2010 13:08
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 18:32
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