Pathological Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Cellular Adenoma according to the Clinical Context.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_50D3139D030F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Pathological Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Cellular Adenoma according to the Clinical Context.
Périodique
International Journal of Hepatology
Auteur(s)
Bioulac-Sage P., Sempoux C., Possenti L., Frulio N., Laumonier H., Laurent C., Chiche L., Frédéric Blanc J., Saric J., Trillaud H., Le Bail B., Balabaud C.
ISSN
2090-3448 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
2013
Pages
253261
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In Europe and North America, hepatocellular adenomas (HCA) occur, classically, in middle-aged woman taking oral contraceptives. Twenty percent of women, however, are not exposed to oral contraceptives; HCA can more rarely occur in men, children, and women over 65 years. HCA have been observed in many pathological conditions such as glycogenosis, familial adenomatous polyposis, MODY3, after male hormone administration, and in vascular diseases. Obesity is frequent particularly in inflammatory HCA. The background liver is often normal, but steatosis is a frequent finding particularly in inflammatory HCA. The diagnosis of HCA is more difficult when the background liver is fibrotic, notably in vascular diseases. HCA can be solitary, or multiple or in great number (adenomatosis). When nodules are multiple, they are usually of the same subtype. HNF1 α -inactivated HCA occur almost exclusively in woman. The most important point of the classification is the identification of β -catenin mutated HCA, a strong argument to identify patients at risk of malignant transformation. Some HCA already present criteria indicating malignant transformation. When the whole nodule is a hepatocellular carcinoma, it is extremely difficult to prove that it is the consequence of a former HCA. It is occasionally difficult to identify HCA remodeled by necrosis or hemorrhage.
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
26/01/2015 11:41
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 18:32
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