Regional fat mobilization and training type on sedentary, premenopausal overweight and obese women.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: Serval_PostPrint_2014_Regional fat mobilization and training type on sedentary premenopausal overweight and obese women.pdf (2213.84 [Ko])
Etat: Serval
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_50CFCBC8BC2B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Regional fat mobilization and training type on sedentary, premenopausal overweight and obese women.
Périodique
Obesity
Auteur(s)
Carnero E.A., Amati F., Pinto R.S., Valamatos M.J., Mil-Homens P., Sardinha L.B.
ISSN
1930-739X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1930-7381
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Volume
22
Numéro
1
Pages
86-93
Langue
anglais
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the influence of different training types on relative fat mobilization with exercise. The purpose of this study was to analyze the changes induced by aerobic training (AT), resistance (RT) or a combination of both (AT+RT) on total fat mass (TFM) and regional fat mass (RFM). Further, the relative contribution of different regions, upper limbs (UL), lower limbs (LL), and trunk (Tr), were compared.
DESIGN AND METHODS: Forty-five overweight and premenopausal women were randomized in either AT, RT or AT+RT. All training groups exercised for the same duration (60 min), 3 times per week for 5 months. Body composition was estimated using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.
RESULTS: TFM decreased significantly in all groups (-4.6 ± 1.9 kg; -3.8 ± 2.6 kg, and -4.7 ± 3.0 kg in AT, RT, and AT+RT groups respectively; P < 0.001). The relative contribution of FM into each segment changed significantly: TrFM represented 46.6% ± 5.8% of TFM at baseline and reduced to 43.1% ± 5.5% (P < 0.001); LLFM was 39.7% ± 5.8% vs. 41.6% ± 5.7% (P < 0.01); ULFM was 11.3% ± 1.3% vs. 12.2% ± 1.4% (P < 0.01).
CONCLUSION: Training type did not influence changes of TFM and RFM. Fat mobilization came predominantly from Tr in all training protocols. These findings suggest that overweight and obese women can reduce TFM and RFM, independently of training type.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/01/2014 23:16
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 18:32
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