Distinct brain representations of processed and unprocessed foods.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_4F05FE3EEB12
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Distinct brain representations of processed and unprocessed foods.
Périodique
The European journal of neuroscience
Auteur(s)
Coricelli C., Toepel U., Notter M.L., Murray M.M., Rumiati R.I.
ISSN
1460-9568 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0953-816X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
22/06/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Résumé
Among all of the stimuli surrounding us, food is arguably the most rewarding for the essential role it plays in our survival. In previous visual recognition research, it has already been demonstrated that the brain not only differentiates edible stimuli from non-edible stimuli but also is endowed with the ability to detect foods' idiosyncratic properties such as energy content. Given the contribution of the cooked diet to human evolution, in the present study we investigated whether the brain is sensitive to the level of processing food underwent, based solely on its visual appearance. We thus recorded visual evoked potentials (VEPs) from normal-weight healthy volunteers who viewed color images of unprocessed and processed foods equated in caloric content. Results showed that VEPs and underlying neural sources differed as early as 130 ms post-image onset when participants viewed unprocessed versus processed foods, suggesting a within-category early discrimination of food stimuli. Responses to unprocessed foods engaged the inferior frontal and temporal regions and the premotor cortices. In contrast, viewing processed foods led to the recruitment of occipito-temporal cortices bilaterally, consistently with other motivationally relevant stimuli. This is the first evidence of diverging brain responses to food as a function of the transformation undergone during its preparation that provides insights on the spatiotemporal dynamics of food recognition.
Mots-clé
Electrical neuroimaging, Event-related potential (ERP), Object categorization, Object recognition, electrical neuroimaging, event-related potential, object categorization, object recognition
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
15/07/2019 17:17
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 6:35
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