Within-population polymorphism of sex-determination systems in the common frog (Rana temporaria).

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_4D062DA60F4A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Within-population polymorphism of sex-determination systems in the common frog (Rana temporaria).
Périodique
Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Auteur(s)
Rodrigues N., Betto-Colliard C., Jourdan-Pineau H., Perrin N.
ISSN
1420-9101 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-061X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Numéro
7
Pages
1569-1577
Langue
anglais
Résumé
In sharp contrast with birds and mammals, the sex chromosomes of ectothermic vertebrates are often undifferentiated, for reasons that remain debated. A linkage map was recently published for Rana temporaria (Linnaeus, 1758) from Fennoscandia (Eastern European lineage), with a proposed sex-determining role for linkage group 2 (LG2). We analysed linkage patterns in lowland and highland populations from Switzerland (Western European lineage), with special focus on LG2. Sibship analyses showed large differences from the Fennoscandian map in terms of recombination rates and loci order, pointing to large-scale inversions or translocations. All linkage groups displayed extreme heterochiasmy (total map length was 12.2 cM in males, versus 869.8 cM in females). Sex determination was polymorphic within populations: a majority of families (with equal sex ratios) showed a strong correlation between offspring phenotypic sex and LG2 paternal haplotypes, whereas other families (some of which with female-biased sex ratios) did not show any correlation. The factors determining sex in the latter could not be identified. This coexistence of several sex-determination systems should induce frequent recombination of X and Y haplotypes, even in the absence of male recombination. Accordingly, we found no sex differences in allelic frequencies on LG2 markers among wild-caught male and female adults, except in one high-altitude population, where nonrecombinant Y haplotypes suggest sex to be entirely determined by LG2. Multifactorial sex determination certainly contributes to the lack of sex-chromosome differentiation in amphibians.
Mots-clé
Amphibians, heterochiasmy, sex chromosome evolution, turnover, sex-specific recombination, sex determination
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
15/03/2013 14:26
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:01
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