Agreeableness, antagonism, and mental health across cultures

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: Tous droits réservés
ID Serval
serval:BIB_4CF845686C96
Type
Partie de livre
Sous-type
Chapitre: chapitre ou section
Collection
Publications
Titre
Agreeableness, antagonism, and mental health across cultures
Titre du livre
The Handbook of Antagonism Conceptualizations, Assessment, Consequences, and Treatment of the Low End of Agreeableness
Auteur(s)
Thalmayer Amber Gayle, Rossier Jerome
Editeur
Academic Press of Elsevier
Lieu d'édition
125 London Wall, London EC2Y 5AS, United Kingdom
525 B Street, Suite 1650, San Diego, CA 92101, United States
50 Hampshire Street, 5th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States
The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, United Kingdom
ISBN
978-0-12-814627-9
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/02/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Numéro de chapitre
7
Pages
97-107
Langue
anglais
Résumé
This chapter reviews evidence about Agreeableness and antagonism and their association with mental health across cultures. Agreeableness is a personality dimension defined in a Western context, but which corresponds to a reasonable degree with indigenous dimensions found in other cultural settings. Studies translating Western measures into other languages have found similar factor structures, but not evidence for scalar measurement invariance, which would allow for reliable comparison of scores across cultural and linguistic settings. Interestingly, however, lower average scores for men versus women appear to be more pronounced in industrialized nations with greater gender equity. Agreeableness appears to increase with age across cultures, in particular around the time of taking on adult financial responsibilities. The symptoms and disorders associated with antagonism, including conduct disorder, aggression, psychopathy, antisocial personality disorder, substance use disorders, and borderline personality disorder, generally appear to be globally comprehensible and diagnosable. However, specific symptom patterns can vary considerably, and rates of aggressive behavior and related symptoms appear to be more common in individualistic, industrialized cultures.
Mots-clé
cultural psychology, cross-cultural psychology, Big Five, personality traits, Agreeableness, mental disorders, psychopathy, aggression, antisocial personality disorder, personality disorders
Création de la notice
23/09/2019 11:06
Dernière modification de la notice
09/10/2019 6:08
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