Coparenting Behaviors as Mediators between Postpartum Parental Depressive Symptoms and Toddler's Symptoms.

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Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_4CE2524C48E7
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Coparenting Behaviors as Mediators between Postpartum Parental Depressive Symptoms and Toddler's Symptoms.
Périodique
Frontiers in psychology
Auteur(s)
Tissot H., Favez N., Frascarolo F., Despland J.N.
ISSN-L
1664-1078
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Pages
1912
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Postpartum parental depression, even of mild intensity and short duration, has negative consequences on child development, including increased externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Studies revealed that the links between parental depression and child development are mediated by parenting difficulties. On the other hand, the mediating role of problematic family-level relationships, such as low coparenting support and high conflict between the parents, has rarely been considered, although coparenting difficulties have been linked with both increased depressive symptoms in parents and increased symptoms in toddlers. In the present study, we proposed testing a comprehensive mediation model linking parental depression, coparenting, and child symptoms. At 3 months postpartum, a convenience sample of 69 parental couples completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. In addition, we assessed levels of coparenting support and conflict during a mother-father-infant play situation, the Lausanne Trilogue Play. At 18 months postpartum, both parents assessed child symptoms with the Symptom Checklist Questionnaire. The results showed that coparenting support mediated the links between parental depressive symptoms and child symptoms, but only for mothers: Maternal depressive symptoms were linked with lower coparenting support, which in turn predicted increased psychofunctional symptoms and behavior problems assessed by mothers. Although coparenting conflict behaviors were not predicted by parents' depressive symptoms, higher conflict was unexpectedly linked with fewer behavior problems assessed by both parents. The present study allowed us to unveil complex pathways between mild parental mood disturbances, family-level relationships, and child development in the first months of the child's life.

Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
05/01/2017 11:41
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:01
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