Sunlight and carcinogenesis: expression of p53 and pyrimidine dimers in human skin following UVA I, UVA I + II and solar simulating radiations

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_4CC39E79BE70
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Sunlight and carcinogenesis: expression of p53 and pyrimidine dimers in human skin following UVA I, UVA I + II and solar simulating radiations
Périodique
International Journal of Cancer
Auteur(s)
Burren  R., Scaletta  C., Frenk  E., Panizzon  R. G., Applegate  L. A.
ISSN
0020-7136 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
04/1998
Volume
76
Numéro
2
Pages
201-6
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Apr 13
Résumé
DNA damage by UV radiation plays an essential role in skin cancer induction. We report that even sub-erythemal doses of solar simulating radiation, are capable of inducing substantial nuclear damage, namely pyrimidine dimers and p53 induction in human skin in situ. The quantity and distribution of p53 induced in human skin by UV radiation depended highly on the waveband and dose of UV used. Solar simulating radiation induced very high levels of p53 throughout all layers in epidermal keratinocytes 24 hr following an erythemal dose (230+/-15.9/1000 cells), and the induction followed a dose response. Following UVA I + II and UVA I radiations, p53 expression was approximately half of that seen with equivalent biological doses of solar simulating radiation (63.5+/-28.5 and 103+/-15.9, respectively). Expression of p53 was seen in basal cell keratinocytes at lower doses of UVA, but all layers of the epidermis were affected at higher doses. Pyrimidine dimer induction, however, was seen to be the same for equivalent biological doses of UVA I, UVA I + II and solar simulating radiations, which coincides with previous findings that pyrimidine dimers initiate the erythemal response and are implicated in skin carcinogenesis. When equivalent biological doses of pure UVA are used with no UVB contamination, significant nuclear alterations occur in human skin in situ, which can approach those seen with UVB radiation. Our results suggest that DNA damage assessed in vivo by immunohistochemistry could provide a very sensitive endpoint for determining the efficacy of protective measures, such as sunscreens or protective clothing, against both UVB- and UVA-induced damage in human skin.
Mots-clé
Adult Antibodies DNA/metabolism *DNA Damage Gene Expression Genes, p53 Humans Immunohistochemistry Middle Aged Pyrimidine Dimers/*biosynthesis Skin/*metabolism Skin Neoplasms/*etiology/metabolism Sunlight/*adverse effects Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/*biosynthesis/immunology Ultraviolet Rays
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 16:54
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:01
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