Distribution of artifactual gas on post-mortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT).

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Ressource 1Télécharger: serval:BIB_4AE968FCA2ED.P001 (561.83 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
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ID Serval
serval:BIB_4AE968FCA2ED
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Distribution of artifactual gas on post-mortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT).
Périodique
International Journal of Legal Medicine
Auteur(s)
Egger C., Bize P., Vaucher P., Mosimann P., Schneider B., Dominguez A., Meuli R., Mangin P., Grabherr S.
ISSN
1437-1596 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0937-9827
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Volume
126
Numéro
1
Pages
3-12
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
PURPOSE: We investigated the incidence and distribution of post-mortem gas detected with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to identify factors that could distinguish artifactual gas from cardiac air embolism. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MDCT data of 119 cadavers were retrospectively examined. Gas was semiquantitatively assessed in selected blood vessels, organs, and body spaces (82 total sites). RESULTS: Seventy-four of the 119 cadavers displayed gas (62.2%; CI 95% 52.8-70.9), and 56 (75.7%) displayed gas in the heart. Most gas was detected in the hepatic parenchyma (40%), right heart (38% ventricle, 35% atrium), inferior vena cava (30% infrarenally, 26% suprarenally), hepatic veins (26% left, 29% middle, 22% right), and portal spaces (29%). Male cadavers displayed gas more frequently than female cadavers. Gas was detected 5-84 hours after death; therefore, the post-mortem interval could not reliably predict gas distribution (rho = 0.719, p < 0.0001). We found that a large amount of putrefaction-generated gas in the right heart was associated with aggregated gas bubbles in the hepatic parenchyma (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 89.7%). In contrast, gas in the left heart (sensitivity = 41.7%, specificity = 100%) or in periumbilical subcutaneous tissues (sensitivity = 50%, specificity = 96.3%) could not predict gas due to putrefaction. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to show that the appearance of post-mortem gas follows a specific distribution pattern. An association between intracardiac gas and hepatic parenchymal gas could distinguish between post-mortem-generated gas and vital air embolism. We propose that this finding provides a key for diagnosing death due to cardiac air embolism.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
31/01/2011 8:51
Dernière modification de la notice
01/10/2019 6:17
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