Probing cardiac metabolism by hyperpolarized 13C MR using an exclusively endogenous substrate mixture and photo-induced nonpersistent radicals.

Détails

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Etat: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
ID Serval
serval:BIB_4A7F26295205
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Probing cardiac metabolism by hyperpolarized 13C MR using an exclusively endogenous substrate mixture and photo-induced nonpersistent radicals.
Périodique
Magnetic resonance in medicine
Auteur(s)
Bastiaansen JAM, Yoshihara HAI, Capozzi A., Schwitter J., Gruetter R., Merritt M.E., Comment A.
ISSN
1522-2594 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0740-3194
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
79
Numéro
5
Pages
2451-2459
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To probe the cardiac metabolism of carbohydrates and short chain fatty acids simultaneously in vivo following the injection of a hyperpolarized <sup>13</sup> C-labeled substrate mixture prepared using photo-induced nonpersistent radicals.
Droplets of mixed [1- <sup>13</sup> C]pyruvic and [1- <sup>13</sup> C]butyric acids were frozen into glassy beads in liquid nitrogen. Ethanol addition was investigated as a means to increase the polarization level. The beads were irradiated with ultraviolet light and the radical concentration was measured by ESR spectroscopy. Following dynamic nuclear polarization in a 7T polarizer, the beads were dissolved, and the radical-free hyperpolarized solution was rapidly transferred into an injection pump located inside a 9.4T scanner. The hyperpolarized solution was injected in healthy rats to measure cardiac metabolism in vivo.
Ultraviolet irradiation created nonpersistent radicals in a mixture containing <sup>13</sup> C-labeled pyruvic and butyric acids, and enabled the hyperpolarization of both substrates by dynamic nuclear polarization. Ethanol addition increased the radical concentration from 16 to 26 mM. Liquid-state <sup>13</sup> C polarization was 3% inside the pump at the time of injection, and increased to 5% by addition of ethanol to the substrate mixture prior to ultraviolet irradiation. In the rat heart, the in vivo <sup>13</sup> C signals from lactate, alanine, bicarbonate, and acetylcarnitine were detected following the metabolism of the injected substrate mixture.
Copolarization of two different <sup>13</sup> C-labeled substrates and the detection of their myocardial metabolism in vivo was achieved without using persistent radicals. The absence of radicals in the solution containing the hyperpolarized <sup>13</sup> C-substrates may simplify the translation to clinical use, as no radical filtration is required prior to injection.
Mots-clé
Animals, Butyrates/metabolism, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Carbon Isotopes/analysis, Carbon Isotopes/metabolism, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/methods, Male, Myocardium/metabolism, Pyruvic Acid/metabolism, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, carbon-13, energy metabolism, hyperpolarization, metabolic imaging, oxidative metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
08/02/2018 11:59
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:58
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