Short vs. long pulses for testing knee extensor neuromuscular properties: does it matter?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_47FC8C91F3B6
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Short vs. long pulses for testing knee extensor neuromuscular properties: does it matter?
Périodique
European Journal of Applied Physiology
Auteur(s)
Giroux C., Roduit B., Rodriguez-Falces J., Duchateau J., Maffiuletti N.A., Place N.
ISSN
1439-6327 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1439-6319
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
118
Numéro
2
Pages
361-369
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The present study aimed at comparing knee extensor neuromuscular properties determined with transcutaneous electrical stimulation using two pulse durations before and after a standardized fatigue protocol.
In the first sub-study, 19 healthy participants (ten women and nine men; 28 ± 5 years) took part to two separate testing sessions involving the characterization of voluntary activation (twitch interpolation technique), muscle contractility (evoked forces by single and paired stimuli), and neuromuscular propagation (M-wave amplitude from vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles) obtained at supramaximal intensity with a pulse duration of either 0.2 or 1 ms. The procedures were identical in the second sub-study (N = 11), except that neuromuscular properties were also evaluated after a standardized fatiguing exercise. Electrical stimulation was delivered through large surface electrodes positioned over the quadriceps muscle and a visual analog scale was used to evaluate the discomfort to paired stimuli evoked at rest.
There was no difference between pulse durations in the estimates of voluntary activation, neuromuscular propagation, and muscle contractility both in the non-fatigued and fatigued states. The discomfort associated with supramaximal paired electrical stimuli was also comparable between the two pulse durations.
It appears that 0.2- and 1-ms-long pulses provide a comparable evaluation of knee extensor neuromuscular properties.

Mots-clé
Contractile properties, Discomfort, Pulse width, Quadriceps, Transcutaneous electrical stimulation, Voluntary activation
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
14/12/2017 19:06
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:51
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