Low-dose multidetector computed tomography of the cervical spine: optimization of iterative reconstruction strength levels.

Détails

Ressource 1Demande d'une copie Sous embargo indéterminé.
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_47A965E3AF28
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Low-dose multidetector computed tomography of the cervical spine: optimization of iterative reconstruction strength levels.
Périodique
Acta Radiologica
Auteur(s)
Omoumi P., Verdun F.R., Ben Salah Y., Vande Berg B.C., Lecouvet F.E., Malghem J., Ott J.G., Meuli R., Becce F.
ISSN
1600-0455 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0284-1851
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
55
Numéro
3
Pages
335-344
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques reduce image noise in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging. They can therefore be used to reduce radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality nearly constant. However, CT manufacturers offer several strength levels of IR to choose from.
PURPOSE: To determine the optimal strength level of IR in low-dose MDCT of the cervical spine.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty consecutive patients investigated by low-dose cervical spine MDCT were prospectively studied. Raw data were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and sinogram-affirmed IR (SAFIRE, strength levels 1 to 5) techniques. Image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured at C3-C4 and C6-C7 levels. Two radiologists independently and blindly evaluated various anatomical structures (both dense and soft tissues) using a 4-point scale. They also rated the overall diagnostic image quality using a 10-point scale.
RESULTS: As IR strength levels increased, image noise decreased linearly, while SNR and CNR both increased linearly at C3-C4 and C6-C7 levels (P < 0.001). For the intervertebral discs, the content of neural foramina and dural sac, and for the ligaments, subjective image quality scores increased linearly with increasing IR strength level (P ≤ 0.03). Conversely, for the soft tissues and trabecular bone, the scores decreased linearly with increasing IR strength level (P < 0.001). Finally, the overall diagnostic image quality scores increased linearly with increasing IR strength level (P < 0.001).
CONCLUSION: The optimal strength level of IR in low-dose cervical spine MDCT depends on the anatomical structure to be analyzed. For the intervertebral discs and the content of neural foramina, high strength levels of IR are recommended.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/04/2014 16:30
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:54
Données d'usage