Prescription of sedative drugs during hospital stay: A Swiss prospective study.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: Final published version
Licence: Non spécifiée
ID Serval
serval:BIB_4790E165A91A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Prescription of sedative drugs during hospital stay: A Swiss prospective study.
Périodique
Drugs Real World Outcomes
Auteur(s)
Schumacher L., Dobrinas M., Tagan D., Sautebin A., Blanc A.L., Widmer N.
ISSN
2199-1154 (Print)
ISSN-L
2198-9788
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
4
Numéro
4
Pages
225-234
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
In recent years, the number of prescriptions for sedative drugs has increased significantly, as has their long-term use. Moreover, sedative use is frequently initiated during hospital stays.
This study aimed to describe new prescriptions of sedative drugs during hospital stays and evaluate their maintenance as discharge medication.
This observational prospective study took place in an internal medicine ward of a Swiss hospital over a period of 3 months in 2014. Demographic (age, sex, diagnosis, comorbidities) and medication data [long-term use of sedative drugs, new regular or pro re nata ('as needed') prescriptions of sedative drugs, drug-related problems] were collected. Sedative medications included: benzodiazepines, Z-drugs, antihistamines, antidepressants, neuroleptics, herbal drugs, and clomethiazole. McNemar's test was used for comparison.
Of 290 patients included, 212 (73%) were over 65 years old and 169 (58%) were women; 34% (n = 98) were using sedative drugs long term before their hospital stay, and 44% (n = 128) had a prescription for sedative drugs at discharge-a 10% increase (p < 0.05). Sedative drugs were newly prescribed to 37% (n = 108) of patients during their stay. Among these, 37% (n = 40) received a repeat prescription at discharge. Over half of the sedative drugs were prescribed within 24 h of admission. Drug-related problems were detected in 76% of new prescriptions, of which 90% were drug-drug interactions.
This study showed that hospital stays increased the proportion of patients who were prescribed a sedative drug at discharge by 10% (absolute increase). These prescriptions may generate long-term use and expose patients to drug-related problems. Promoting alternative approaches for managing insomnia are recommended.
Pubmed
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
09/10/2017 10:15
Dernière modification de la notice
29/05/2019 7:08
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