Neonatal adaptation of energy and protein metabolism

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_4721285D2A53
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Neonatal adaptation of energy and protein metabolism
Périodique
Journal of Perinatal Medicine
Auteur(s)
Micheli J.L., Schisler K., Schutz Y., Pfister R., Calame A., Jéquier E.
ISSN
0300-5577 (Print)
ISSN-L
0300-5577
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
1991
Volume
19 Suppl 1
Pages
87-106
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
During the last decade, the development of "bedside" investigative methods, including indirect calorimetry, nutritional balance and stable isotope techniques, have given a new insight into energy and protein metabolism in the neonates. Neonates and premature infants especially, create an unusual opportunity to study the metabolic adaptation to extrauterine life because their physical environment can be controlled, their energy intake and energy expenditure can be measured and the link between their protein metabolism and the energetics of their postnatal growth can be assessed with accuracy. Thus, relatively abstract physiological concepts such as the postnatal timecourse of heat production, energy cost of growth, energy cost of physical activity, thermogenic effect of feeding, efficiency of protein gain, metabolic cost of protein gain and protein turnover have been quantified. These results show that energy expenditure and heat production rates increase postnatally from average values of 40 kcal/kgxday during the first week to 60 kcal/kgxday in the third week. This increase parellels nutritional intakes as well as the rate of weight gain. The thermogenic effect of feeding and the physical activity are relatively low and account only for an average of 5% each of the total heat production. The cost of protein turnover is the highest energy demanding process. The fact that nitrogen balance becomes positive within 72 hours after birth places the newborn in a transitional situation of dissociated balance between energy and protein metabolism: dry body mass and fat decrease while there is a gain in protein and increase in supine length. This particular situation ends during the second postnatal week and soon thereafter the rate of weight gain matches the statural growth. The goals of the following review are to summarize recent data on the physiological aspects of energy and protein metabolism directly related to the extrauterine adaptation, to describe experimental approaches which recently were adapted to the newborns in order to get "bedside results" and to discuss how far these results can help everyday's neonatal practice.
Mots-clé
Adaptation, Physiological, Calorimetry, Energy Metabolism, Humans, Infant, Newborn/physiology, Infant, Premature/physiology, Proteins/metabolism, Weight Gain
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
21/01/2008 14:09
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:49
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