Fate and functions of human adult lymphoid cells in immunodeficient mice

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_46D3BD4AF07F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Fate and functions of human adult lymphoid cells in immunodeficient mice
Périodique
Histology and Histopathology
Auteur(s)
Vallet  V., Cherpillod  J., Waridel  F., Duchosal  M. A.
ISSN
0213-3911 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2003
Volume
18
Numéro
1
Pages
309-322
Langue
anglais
Notes
Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Review --- Old month value: Jan
Résumé
Laboratory models enabling to study in vivo human leukocyte functions have been developed. Most of the models consist of human immunocytes transferred to mice homozygous for the scid mutation. Mice with additional immunodeficient-prone genetic background or with immunodeficiency-induced conditioning have also been used. Human grafts mainly consisted of human immune cells in suspension injected intraperitoneally, or in pieces of human organs containing immunocytes implanted subcutaneously. Cells in suspension could be easily manipulated in vitro before transfer to the animal, but disseminated within the mouse body. In opposition, human cells mostly remained within implantation areas of animals given human organ pieces. This favorizes cell interactions and helps for cell recovery after their in vivo passage. Moreover, the diversity of antibodies in animals transplanted with human lymphoid organ pieces appeared broader than that of mice transferred with lymphocytes in suspension. Spontaneous recall antibody and autoantibody productions have been generally observed in animals transferred with cells from donors with such antibodies. In vivo boosting of recall antibody by antigen has been most successful, but such a manipulation inconstantly boosted autoantibodies. Primary human T and B cell responses were difficult to obtain in xenochimeric animals, and success has been generally obtained by optimizing human immune response parameters, such as antigen presentation.
Mots-clé
Animals Autoantibodies/immunology Chimera/genetics/immunology/metabolism Humans Lymphocyte Transfusion Lymphocytes/immunology/*physiology Mice Mice, SCID *Transplants
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 16:24
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 14:52
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