Use of DNA profiles for investigation using a simulated national DNA database: Part II. Statistical and ethical considerations on familial searching.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_468F383942F9
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Use of DNA profiles for investigation using a simulated national DNA database: Part II. Statistical and ethical considerations on familial searching.
Périodique
Forensic Science International. Genetics
Auteur(s)
Hicks T., Taroni F., Curran J., Buckleton J., Castella V., Ribaux O.
ISSN
1878-0326 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1872-4973
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Volume
4
Numéro
5
Pages
316-322
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Familial searching consists of searching for a full profile left at a crime scene in a National DNA Database (NDNAD). In this paper we are interested in the circumstance where no full match is returned, but a partial match is found between a database member's profile and the crime stain. Because close relatives share more of their DNA than unrelated persons, this partial match may indicate that the crime stain was left by a close relative of the person with whom the partial match was found. This approach has successfully solved important crimes in the UK and the USA. In a previous paper, a model, which takes into account substructure and siblings, was used to simulate a NDNAD. In this paper, we have used this model to test the usefulness of familial searching and offer guidelines for pre-assessment of the cases based on the likelihood ratio. Siblings of "persons" present in the simulated Swiss NDNAD were created. These profiles (N=10,000) were used as traces and were then compared to the whole database (N=100,000). The statistical results obtained show that the technique has great potential confirming the findings of previous studies. However, effectiveness of the technique is only one part of the story. Familial searching has juridical and ethical aspects that should not be ignored. In Switzerland for example, there are no specific guidelines to the legality or otherwise of familial searching. This article both presents statistical results, and addresses criminological and civil liberties aspects to take into account risks and benefits of familial searching.
Mots-clé
Alleles, DNA/genetics, Databases, Genetic, Ethics, Family, Humans
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
09/07/2010 15:14
Dernière modification de la notice
03/03/2018 16:48
Données d'usage