Relevance of cohort studies for the study of transplant infectious diseases.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_4671170BE51D
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Relevance of cohort studies for the study of transplant infectious diseases.
Périodique
Current opinion in organ transplantation
Auteur(s)
Berger C., Boggian K., Cusini A., van Delden C., Garzoni C., Hirsch H.H., Khanna N., Koller M., Manuel O., Meylan P., Nadal D., Weisser M., Mueller N.J.
Collaborateur(s)
Transplant Infectious Diseases Working Group, Swiss Transplant Cohort Study
ISSN
1531-7013 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1087-2418
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
12/2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
17
Numéro
6
Pages
581-585
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The debate on the merits of observational studies as compared with randomized trials is ongoing. We will briefly touch on this subject, and demonstrate the role of cohort studies for the description of infectious disease patterns after transplantation. The potential benefits of cohort studies for the clinical management of patients outside of the expected gain in epidemiological knowledge are reviewed. The newly established Swiss Transplantation Cohort Study and in particular the part focusing on infectious diseases will serve as an illustration.
A neglected area of research is the indirect value of large, multicenter cohort studies. These benefits can range from a deepened collaboration to the development of common definitions and guidelines. Unfortunately, very few data exist on the role of such indirect effects on improving quality of patient management.
This review postulates an important role for cohort studies, which should not be viewed as inferior but complementary to established research tools, in particular randomized trials. Randomized trials remain the least bias-prone method to establish knowledge regarding the significance of diagnostic or therapeutic measures. Cohort studies have the power to reflect a real-world situation and to pinpoint areas of knowledge as well as of uncertainty. Prerequisite is a prospective design requiring a set of inclusive data coupled with the meticulous insistence on data retrieval and quality.

Mots-clé
Bias (Epidemiology), Cohort Studies, Communicable Diseases/epidemiology, Communicable Diseases/etiology, Humans, Observation, Organ Transplantation/adverse effects, Prospective Studies, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
13/12/2012 18:10
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:51
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