The role of hypocretin in driving arousal and goal-oriented behaviors.

Détails

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Etat: Serval
Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_45DC38E9FC1C
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The role of hypocretin in driving arousal and goal-oriented behaviors.
Périodique
Brain Research
Auteur(s)
Boutrel B., Cannella N., de Lecea L.
ISSN
1872-6240[electronic], 0006-8993[linking]
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
1314
Pages
103-111
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S. Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The hypocretins (Hcrts), also called orexins, are two neuropeptides secreted by a few thousand neurons restricted to the lateral hypothalamus. The Hcrt peptides bind to two receptors located in nuclei associated with diverse cognitive and physiological functions. Experimental evidence has demonstrated that the physiological roles of hypocretins extend far beyond its initial role in food consumption and has emerged as a key system in the fields of sleep disorders and drug addiction. Here, we discuss recent evidence demonstrating a key role of hypocretin in the motivation for reward seeking in general, and drug taking in particular, and we delineate a physiological framework for this peptidergic system in orchestrating the appropriate levels of alertness required for the elaboration and the execution of goal-oriented behaviors. We propose a general role for hypocretins in mediating arousal, especially when an organism must respond to unexpected stressors and environmental challenges, which serve to shape survival behaviors. We also discuss the limit of the current experimental paradigms to address the question of how a system normally involved in the regulation of vigilance states and hyperarousal may promote a pathological state that elicits compulsive craving and relapse to drug seeking.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
23/02/2010 14:35
Dernière modification de la notice
08/05/2019 17:55
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